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3/29/2014 c6 Guest
I really enjoyed reading your writing and cannot wait until you publish another chapter of the story, the way you let off in the end is a great cliff hanger but i hope it wont stay a cliff hanger for long and seeing that it was updated around early 2013 really has me hoping that you haven't discontinued it
11/15/2013 c6 13a-MAXiMINalist
Haha, it's totally Johnny to show off his the Worthington's artifacts like a museum guide in an effect to indulge in lost pride due to his situation.

Rosie's thoughts "What was this, some kind of crazed period drama" made me laugh and wonder if you were intentionally alluding to Pride and Prejudice. I think of the scene where Elizabeth Bennet visits Mr. Darcy's manor and is enchanted by his artistic tastes. And then the story alludes to "Fitzwailing Darcy" and my thoughts were confirmed.

You describe Johnny's upbringing in a manner that empathizes with his mentality. Johnny doesn't seem to understand that what he is doing is an ego-tour to Rosie, when really he's trying too hard to have Rosie accept his offer and he is trying to treat her like a guest under his mother's instructions. But Rosie wants to be treated like a potential tenant rather than a Worthington guest. Johnny doesn't mean to come off the way he does but never clarifies his actions, and Rosie has reason to believe he's still the same old Johnny (The more I analyze this, the more I detect some Darcy-Worthington parallels).

How you illustrate up Johnny's "ego-tour" and how his home evokes childhood memories has the reader realize that this is no ego-tour, but in some ways, he is subconsciously confiding in Rosie about his upbringing.

There's a power struggle between Rosie and Johnny. Johnny wants a grip on the situation because he knows that losing Rosie's interests means a lost chance to quell his own financial situation. And his dwindling confidence around her presence and his panicky grasp of her arm and Rosie's reaction is captured perfectly here and it acknowledges how Johnny needs Rosie, rival or not.

And then it's his ma to come rescue him. I found the part where Johnny reminds himself that he "always had his mother's hand" quite powerful, as if there's deep-rooted insecurities about his build and his inability to accept what he would view as feminine. But what do ya know, it's his ma that shows those positive traits that welcomes Rosie back to the offer. The intrusion of Shirley Worthington is a clever device for believably pulling Rosie back into the housing offer. I note it's one of the few kind offers that Rosie is receptive to. It helps that they're both mothers and empathize with each other.

Regarding where you read that the ROR house reflected Johnny's personality, you probably might have read it from the Art of Monsters University book from Pixar, the page where Dan Scanlon affirms he wanted to convey through the frat house that Johnny indeed has something at stake. Funny, the scene where Mike wanders the ROR house always struck me as the most character development we get out of Worthington, and he wasn't even present in that scene. It was the scene that represented his obsession with greatness.

I look forward to see what direction this story will go from here, especially with the implications that Shirley knows more than what Johnny thinks.
11/14/2013 c5 a-MAXiMINalist
Rosie's interaction with her brother ingeniously sets up Rosie's reason for resorting to living in the Worthington's housing. And she can't stand that domestic dependency any longer and at least the offer from Worthington would get her an opportunity for less financial burdens and at least it would still technically be her own private space.

The ROR reunion sparks some awkward tensions and things that should seem like trifles when really they are are bothersome things, such as Javier's enviable success at M.I. The fate of his friends just nudged Johnny's grief with his personal issues and insecurities because Johnny is watching them live more prosperous lives. It also illustrates how Johnny isn't even close enough to them to confide his entire situation to his college friends, yet he needs them and tries to be vague to keep his pride. He can't even articulates his reasons for offering rent.

I love how the chapter devotes time to reaffirm Johnny's affection and protectiveness for his mother, and then later, Rosie shows disdain for a "momma's boy."

Something I envy about this story is the time and creativity put into making the Monsters World quite parallel to the human world while giving it its obligatory monster spin. Ewwish, and all the references to humans. And I don't think I can stress enough how you maintain a sense of realism in the story in how the character's behave and why they behave that way.
11/13/2013 c1 64Dixie Darlin
(you didn't abandon this story did you? It's too good to quit on it!)
11/12/2013 c4 13a-MAXiMINalist
I like how it's clarified that Rosie and Johnny had cleared away their college rivalries, that is, until Johnny rekindles this turmoil with an insensitive insult. It highlights their emotional maturity after over a decade since the M.U. events, while they retain a sense of their constant mentalities. Their college past slowly came crawling back to their adulthood. To top it all off, Johnny's the one who made the offer to quell her financial situation which Rosie perceives as a blow to her independence.

The moment when Rosie drops the Wham line to Johnny about the funeral costs, Johnny gets the understanding that the Rosie's situation aren't just financial, but also emotional. While struggling to reserve their own separate situations to themselves, they seem to possess an empathy for their each other without ever acknowledging it. Being that they are/were rivals, they try to find amusement in what they sense are each other's personal problems, but they grow more empathetic the more they know about each other's situation.

Johnny's sudden offer of better rent at his household makes perfect sense and merges their two personal financial conflicts. They are both still trying to compensate for losses that harsh reality brought for them.

The final line in the chapter, "there are other alternatives" reminded of M.U., when Mike was struggling to tough times, undeserved setbacks, and yet, he was always displayed a willingness to work off low points in order to reach his goal. The story captures the reaction to low points and the desperation for other options while still trying to retain a part of the old identity.
11/8/2013 c3 a-MAXiMINalist
I'm sensing a motif here about Johnny's detachment to his co-workers in the work environment. He saw that mysterious "Mercado" name as just a name and rival to play with. And haha, Rosie's amusement to her awareness that she had been competing with Worthington for years. I love how the tension starts with Johnny's revelation of this "Mercado" and how he tries to process his memory between the Rosie Mercado and the Rosie Levin from M.U.. Rosie's understandable reaction to Johnny's insensitive comment is both comedic and dramatic.

I love how you distinguish the internal feelings with external feelings. There's a certain amount of personal turmoil in John but he's private about it just as Rosie is.

I also note how the the first two Johns of the Worthington are deceased, representing the decline of the Worthington's legacy. As the surviving Worthington heir with Scaring prestige, Johnny inherits the consequences of past Worthington's action and now truly has to maintain a responsibility as a Worthington. Now the revelation of those debts that extended long in Johnny's college days has exposed the falsity of the Worthington name. All that pride, "his foundation", he flaunted in college suddenly has been exposed as further obsolete.
11/6/2013 c2 a-MAXiMINalist
I don't know if this fanfiction will ever address it or this is just the fanfiction premise you're rolling with, but I have to point out that canon states that Rosie works at M.I. according to the M.U. end credits. Though I do understand that for Rosie to interact with Johnny in this premise, it would require storywise for Rosie to work at Fear-Co. You don't have to adjust your story to that canon if you like. Just an observation you might consider.

There's plenty for me to say about the dental scene because it succeeds in the build up of tension, even if subtle. The way the dentist remarks about health, which piles upon financial and health complications as well Rosie's status as a struggling single mother, using countdown hand gestures to discipline her child as she endures her increasingly frustrating circumstances. It's juxtaposition of subtle comedy and the seriousness of Rosie's situation.

One of the strongest elements of this chapter is the scene of Rosie's turning to emotional support in comfort food rather than her family, especially when this is shortly after she visits her family. She has a family that would happily provide her the emotional love, but Rosie is too bent in her grief to fully accept their support. It also reveals a sense of her pride in her independence and why the goth-alumna wanted to distance herself from them. Her mother is prying and pushy, so no wonder why a young Rosie would pick up goth culture. To quote, she "hates being put into the position of someone else's hands."

The story has a spot-on depiction of loss. It's never stated outwardly that Rosie is bereaved over the loss of her husband because the writing captures the sense of grief in the objects- Rosie's blouse and an oversized bed- that illustrates the sense of emptiness without ever explicitly saying what happened and how protagonist feels about it.

As I am reading, this is wholly in character of Rosie. Inevitable this story is set over a decade of the events of M.U., so you do what's important by updating Rosie's and Johnny's emotional maturity. They are a lot less callous then their college youth but retain that sense of their mannerisms and attitudes. And with the Monster world attempt to readapt its identity toward Laugh production, this is a time for monsters like Worthington and Rosie to question their individual identity.

Carol
11/5/2013 c1 Ava
(Opps, it turned out I accidentally submitted an unfinished portion of my review so it looked a little clunky and unrefined. Here's the revised one.)

This chapter captures detached nature of the work environment and Johnny acknowledging his lack of connection to workers he's been around for so long. Johnny knows his job, but he doesn't know his acquaintances. I enjoy how you portray Johnny contemplating how a bit of his past has come not only to haunt him, but also many Scarers. Johnny must adjust to change and it's even a bigger slap in the face considering that the change was brought about by two Oozma Kappa alumni.

The chapter realistically portrays the economic and domestic drawbacks of the Laughter switch that M.I. glosses over. The entire switch has exposed the Scarers' vulnerabilities for the first time. They are Scarers with 9 to 5 jobs with need of money for their families and now their Scaring identity, that they have shaped for many years, has just been brushed aside. I have to wonder about the competence of the boss who expects Scarers to immediately expect his Scarers to except the change or else step down from their position. At least with Mike and Sully, I would imagine they would keep some Scaring Floors to accommodate those who couldn't adjust.

Ah, didn't intend the lisp at first with the Slaughter character but it came out of a typing error. Sometimes ideas and inspirations spring out of those chance errors.
11/5/2013 c1 a-MAXiMINalist
And Johnny contemplating how a bit of his past has come not only to haunt him, but also many Scarers. Johnny must adjust to change and it's even a bigger slap in the face considering that the change was brought about by two Oozma Kappa alumni.

This chapter captures detached nature of the work environment or at least Johnny's d and Johnny acknowledging his lack of connection to workers he's been around for so long. Johnny knows his job, but he doesn't know his acquaintances. But the sudden revelation of the change has sparked in Johnny a bit of concern for his co-workers. It develops Johnny's shred of empathy for others.

The chapter realistically portrays the economic and domestic drawbacks of the Laughter switch that M.I. glosses over. The entire switch has exposed the Scarers' vulnerabilities for the first time. They are Scarers with 9 to 5 jobs with need of money for their families and now their Scaring identity, that they have shaped for many years, has just been brushed aside. I have to wonder about the competence of the boss who expects Scarers to immediately expect his Scarers to except the change or else step down from their position. At least with Mike and Sully, I would imagine they would keep some Scaring Floors to accommodate those who couldn't adjust.

Ah, didn't intend the lisp at first but it came out of a typing error. Sometimes ideas and inspirations spring out of those chance errors.
9/14/2013 c6 64Dixie Darlin
hehehe the flying spaghetti monster, I recognized that ;) and Gook-le XD you're so clever with these things. And I laughed at the screaming flower wallpaper.

Yes, I believe writing the tour from Rosie's POV was an excellent decision, since seeing it from the eyes of a newcomer allows her to notice EVERYTHING. Loved the thought of "did i step into a crazed period drama?" hahaha. Glad she decided to stay. Johnny's mom is a hoot XD
8/23/2013 c5 3Mister. Enigma
If Johnny still got a big TV, I bet Billy would worship it and bowing down like he was saying "I'm not worthy!":)
8/21/2013 c5 1Crispy-Ghee
John WIlliams IS a great composer. This is a great chapter. Poor Johnny, I like how potent you make both the pride and worry that the two main characters have.

And thanks for the dedication. It does help a little bit :) I'm sad that since I'm taking this break from everything, thinking Levington will die down again, it's lovely to read this and be reminded that there is still some really good stuff to see. I can't wait to see the next chapter. Keep it up, you're doing very well.
8/20/2013 c5 64Dixie Darlin
another great chapter! Liked seeing the ROR boys again and Rosie's convo with her brother was heartfelt. I imagine it must hurt to leave your home that you made with someone that is no longer there but it will probably help her move on with her life if she literally moves away.
8/13/2013 c4 3Mister. Enigma
Great chapter, don't stop:)
8/12/2013 c4 64Dixie Darlin
B. Uppercrust...could that be...BRADLEY Uppercrust from Extemely Goofy Movie? :D

yeah I work nights, 7pm-7am so I know how hard it is to do things during the day or even socialize. And oh man, I could just FEEL the awkwardness when he found out that Alex had died. At least they found they have something in common: financial problems. lol only Johnny would suggest living together XD
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