BONUS

REASONING

• Journeying to District Two, Indiana and Cato barely felt the motion of the train as it glided along the track. Both of them were still dressed in the black fabrics of mourning, having buried Cashmere, Gloss and Marvel that morning.

• Seated across from each other, the pair of them were occupied by their own tasks. Indiana sketched the Academy, the way it had looked before the war whilst Cato had a book in hand.

• His mind was unable to focus on the words swimming before him. He needed to know. Choosing now to ask was the worst timing he's ever had but he's not sure he could work up the nerve to ask again.

• So, he placed down the book and called his wife's name. Her hand stilled and her blue eyes gazed up at him with such love. One hand rested on the small bump of her stomach. A reminder of the life they were creating together.

• Clearing his throat, Cato twisted the wedding band around his finger. Perhaps this conversation will end in me sleeping alone tonight, he pondered. Reminding himself that he wasn't lacking courage (even if his wife scared him), he spoke.

• "Why did you do it? Why did you vote yes?"

• Indiana looked away from him. He immediately began regretting his decision to ask. Now wasn't the time, and it's not the place. Opening his mouth to begin apologising, Cato was silenced when she sighed and started to explain. Tears glistened in her eyes.

• "Look, I may one day grow to regret that decision, and I live with the knowledge that I can never take it back. I will carry the guilt of those children's deaths for the rest of my life, but how could I say no to the opportunity for revenge? Cato, what happened to me there-."

• Her voice broke, and she took a large gulp of water before continuing. Indiana finally told Cato all that had happened to her. All that she had previously shared with Peeta, and Peeta alone was now knowledge to Cato.

• She told him about what she had done to her arms, she told him about the voices and being able to feel Marvel's arms around her as she cried. She told him all that happened during the sessions where Snow tortured her, right down to how the pain felt. All the feelings, all the thoughts, and all the times she had given up was finally spoken aloud.

• Teeth sinking into his knuckle to stop himself from screaming, Cato wished he could take back all the times he had wanted to be as close to her as Peeta had been. Cato had wanted to be there for Indiana in the ways that Peeta could be. Now, he felt horrid for ever having those thoughts. He wished he didn't know any of it. It was all too sick, but that was his wife across from him.

• "Snow might've been the one who gave the orders but those who hurt me chose to. They had control over their actions and they had a choice. They chose wrong. When I was given a choice, I chose the one that would cause pain. Maybe I chose wrong too but they deserve a taste of their own medicine."

• Cato disagreed. He didn't think hurting someone who hurt you made things better. Two wrongs, don't make a right. But, there were times he had been tempted to do such things. He had wanted to kill Peeta for killing Indiana. Heck, he had killed his own father because he had been the one responsible for Indiana whilst she was imprisoned in the Capitol.

• Cato didn't think killing children could ever fix the pain that had been done to them but he understood nevertheless. So, he reached over and held her hand tightly, promising that he would be there for her no matter how dark her thoughts got.


MEETING THE FAMILY

• Seated around a wooden table, Indiana smiled at the animated chatter of the people around her. So this is what it's like to have a bigger family.

• When they first turned up at the Hadley household, Cato's mother had darted past her son and pulled Indiana in for a large hug, squeezing her tightly. She had only released her when Cato told her to be careful of the baby. Well, at the mention of a baby, Cato's mother had clung on tightly and cried.

• Since then, she had been talking to Indiana non-stop. She had even informed her that Indiana had been a part of the Hadley family since the first Games, and that she was glad Cato had made it official.

• Cato, however, had been smacked around the back of his head for getting married without his mother there, volunteering for the Games in the first place, and making her think he was dead at least three times.

• Flustered and warm, Indiana shrugged out of her cardigan. Cato smiled at the small action because it meant she was comfortable enough to have her arms out around them. Amelie (Cato's mother) noted the thick, silvery scars but continued discussing the new Hadley home with Cato.

• Unfortunately, Cato's youngest sister, who had just turned eleven had less tact than her mother and upon noticing them, asked how they had been obtained.

• Unsure whether she was allowed to discuss such dark matters with the child, Indiana looked at her husband and mother-in-law for help. Cato's other sister, who was now thirteen and had only suffered through one Reaping, glanced between the adults inquisitively.

• "Indiana was very brave, Beth, and she fought very hard against the Capitol to help put an end to the Hunger Games. Unfortunately, Indie got injured quite badly and there are some wounds that can't be healed completely." Cato explained softly, holding his wife's hand tightly.

• "So, you got those fighting against the bad guys?" Lilibeth asked in wonder. Despite the world she had grown up in, Cato had idolised his baby sister and had done his best to shield her from the harsh reality of Panem. Indiana was amazed to see that some children were still just children, naïve and hopeful.

Glancing down at Lilibeth's wide gaze, Indiana was suddenly proud of the scars on her arm.

• Yes, they had been obtained in a moment where Indiana had never been weaker but she had helped put a stop to the Hunger Games. And she had done it for children like the young girl before her. Ensuring that all the children in Panem grew up to lead far more innocent lives than Lilibeth made all the pain Indiana had suffered through worth it.

• Wrapping her arms around her new sister, Lilibeth thanked her for saving her from ever having to enter the arena, and a tear fell down Indiana's cheek. "So, do you have any other cool scars?"

• "Beth." Cato scolded but Indiana just brushed him off. Rolling up the leg of the soft pants she wore, Indiana showed the curious girl the marks that had been left by the Mutt.

• "Wicked," gasped Lilibeth, running a finger over the raised flesh.


CATO'S FATHER

• Following Lilibeth's demands, Indiana had tucked the small girl into bed and told her how much of an amazing aunt she would be to the small babies growing inside her stomach. Hesitantly, Lilibeth had reached out and placed her hand on the small bump, marvelling at the fact that she would get to be an aunt.

• Once the small girl had fallen asleep, Cato guided Indiana to his bedroom.

• Photos decorated the hallway as they walked along it and Indiana stilled when her eyes landed on a face she had hoped to never see again. Cato had promised that those who had been responsible for keeping her 'contained' in the Capitol had been disposed of. But, she was looking directly at one.

• Internally cursing himself for not remembering that the portrait was there, Cato pinched the bridge of his nose when Indiana asked about the man in the photo.

• "That's my father," he admitted, voice quieting.

• His mother, whilst aware of what his father had done during the war and why he was dead, was unaware of who had done it. Whilst he knew he needed to tell Indiana, he wasn't ready to face his mother.

• "And, yes, I know who he was and what he did."

• Pulling Indiana all the way to the end of the hallway, Cato passed his bedroom and locked them both into the training room. It was the only room in the house that was soundproofed so he didn't have to worry about any younger ears overhearing.

• His sisters had an unfortunate habit of wandering into his room when they were unable to sleep.

• "Indie, I've done so many bad things these past few years. I regret all of them. I go to sleep and all I can see are the faces of those I killed. Except him. He's the only one I don't see. My greatest crime is that I killed my father and I don't even regret it. Because he hurt you. I would burn the world down if I thought it would stop any pain you were in. And that scares me. I killed my own father, Indie, and I barely even think about it. I'm a monster."

• Cato sank to his knees, head buried in his hands as sobs wracked his body. Indiana shuffled down to his height, pulling him in for a tight hug. Hand stroking the back of his head, she whispered soothing sounds into his ear until he was able to breathe again.

• "You are not a monster, Cato. You're a protector. You protect those you love. Those little girls down that hallway idolise you, Cato. To them, you're their hero. You're the knight they read about in fairy tales. Fairy tales you read to them before you checked under their bed for Mutts. Lilibeth took great joy in telling me about that. You did what you felt was right and nobody would ever blame you for that. Your mother won't blame you for that. But, perhaps, telling her will make this feeling go away. You can both get the closure you need. However, you need to remember that nobody in this house will ever believe you are a monster. Our children will have the bravest, sweetest man as their father and they couldn't be luckier."

• Tears continued to stream down his face but he awkwardly clambered to his feet and left the room.

• Worried about where he was going/what he was doing, Indiana followed after him but hung back when he knocked on his mother's door.

• "Cato? Is everything okay, dear?"

• "Mum, I have to tell you something."

• "Cato, sweetie, I already know she's knocked up. And you're married so it's not much of a shock." Amelie joked until she saw the look on the newlyweds face.

• Grabbing her robe, Amelie wrapped it around her body and shuffled the the young adults down the stairs and into the kitchen.

• Boiling the kettle, she sat down across from her son (who was holding Indiana's hand with such strength that his right knuckles had turned white) and placed her hand atop his left one. The cold metal of his wedding band reminded her of how much her son had grown in the past two years.

• "Now, start at the beginning."


10 YEARS LATER

• The Hadleys and the Odairs were seated on the soft sand of the beach. A large picnic basket rested between the two married couples.

• Finnick had his arms wrapped around his redheaded wife, a large hand resting on her swollen belly.

• Curled up in Cato's lap, Indiana smiled as the sea breeze rustled the blonde strands of her hair.

• Delighted peals of laughter floated up to them as the four adults watched the four children splashing around in the clear waters of the sea.

• Marvel and Theo Hadley both had small spears in their hands, blue eyes scanning the waters for any sign of fish. An excited 'whoop' escaped Marvel's mouth as he stabbed a fish, claiming victory over his brother. Theo grumbled in contempt, shoving his twin before promising to find a bigger fish.

• Both boys had identical blond hair and blue eyes. The only way to tell them apart was that Marvel had been born with a birthmark over his heart. Cato had laughed when he noticed it was in the shape of an arrow.

• Further away, Finnick Jr. had a fishing net in his hand and was teaching Lie Hadley how to tie certain knots. Both of them were sat on the shoreline, allowing the water to lick at their feet.

• Lie had dark skin and even darker hair but her eyes were a mesmerizing honey colour. After the war, many children had been left without a family and so, eight years ago, Cato and Indiana adopted the one-year-old girl.

• Marvel charged towards the peaceful children, fish in hand and threatening to shove it in his sister's face. Shrieking in disgust, Lie huddled close to Finnick Jr when he pushed her behind him and stood over her protectively.

• "We need to keep an eye on that child. I don't need him falling in love with my baby girl." Cato whispered in Indiana's ear.

• "Come off it, mate." Finnick chuckled. "We both know you can't stand in the way of love. Look at the four of us."

• Finnick was right, of course. That didn't stop Cato from being overprotective of his only daughter. Annie smiled up at her husband, registering the conversation slightly later than everyone else. Whilst the silence of the world agreed with her, her mind could never be what it had once been.

• All four of them were scarred. All four of them still woke up in the night, screaming from pain that no longer existed.

• But they had things to be grateful for, and they had love that would never fade.