Star Trek Hunter
Episode 19: The Ivonovic Commission
Scene 3: Emory's Greatest Hits on Subspace Radio Ivonovic
.

19.3
Emory's Greatest Hits on Subspace Radio Ivonovic
.

"In the past several decades we have increasingly invested Federation lives and resources into an interpretation of the Prime Directive that our ancestors never envisioned. Star Fleet now stands watch over more than a dozen worlds to enforce the Prime Directive not only as a discipline, but as a principle. We fight battles and shed our blood to protect these primitive pre-warp societies against other space-faring races. Sometimes at the expense of our own colonies."

"All the orion slavers need do to raid a federation colony is to, at the same time, threaten a primitive species and Star Fleet races off to protect the so-called innocents. But if these same innocents were threatened by a stray asteroid tumbling toward their planet, Star Fleet would not lift a finger."

"We fought for generations to protect one such world, only to see them exterminate their own species, destroying their own habitat with industrial waste until they could no longer survive on their own planet. Nearly 150 years of protection from ferengi traders, orion slavers and nausicaan pirates. Hundreds of our people killed in battle. All so that a doomed race of savages could die in ignorance, never knowing they were not alone in the universe."

.
A***A
.

"In the Federation, we are justly proud of our military prowess. We lost ships in skirmishes with the klingons and the romulans, so we built stronger, faster ships. The borg destroyed fleets of our ships. So we built more fleets. The cardassians defeated battalions of our ground forces, so we created and sent in twice as many battalions. The Dominion infiltrated and threatened our homeworld and in return we came within a breath of exterminating theirs. Tens of billions of people – from dozens of species – have come to rely on an apparently inexhaustible supply of human warriors, human explorers, human diplomats – an unfathomable well of human ingenuity and adaptability. We have become their champions. They shelter under our shields, they cheer our victories, they mourn our losses."

"We compare ourselves to the ancient Romans. When defeated, we only come back twice as strong and twice as determined. Like the ancient Romans, we stand watch over a vast empire. Like the ancient Romans we have found many, many people who are not us and have adopted them as us. We have incorporated the ancient wisdom of the vulcans and the military genius of the battle-hardened andorians. And like ancient Rome, our own people live in unprecedented opulence and comfort. We have built paradises out of barren rocks."

"But let me ask you, my proud fellow-citizen, whatever happened to those ancient Romans?"

.
A***A
.

"Do not lose contact with the soil. Human colonists have always been first and foremost farmers. Seeking fertile soil in which to plant their crop. Developing new uses for new crops to bring to market. My ancestors were farmers and I grew up on my grandparents' farm, tilling the rocky but fertile soil of Pilgrim's Landing on the Colony of New Hope."

"Now we use replicators to feed cities with populations in the tens and hundreds of millions. Entire generations grow up without knowing the soil. To them it is only dirt. They think replicators magically create food out of mid-air. There is no such magic."

"Replicators make food from compost, from waste products, from spoiled food. They make the indigestible digestible. And unseen to most city dwellers, they purify human waste to go back into the soil to feed the plants that feed us. But replicators need protein sequences to resequence. A starship crew cannot travel forever without soil. And we were not designed to subsist on resequenced compost."

"At some point you must go back to the soil. Set aside a year in your life to work the land. To stand in the sunlight. To hold fresh food in your hand. If you live in a city, garden. Make something grow that will give you fresh food to eat. That connection with the soil is the birthright of every human. It is what makes us human. And if at all you can, when your time has come, give your blood back to the soil that has given you life."

.
19.3