MULDER AND SCULLY'S CAR

WASHINGTON, D.C.

DECEMBER 24th, 2010

2305

The last person was lifted out. The rescue operations were in full swing below. D.C. Police were taking over the murder investigation. Mulder and Scully could leave.

By that time they had installed temporary reinforcements on the front entrance and cleared out the rubble that blocked the door. They could see the outside for the first time since the crash.

Unlike most of the people who were trapped, the agents left by walking out the doors through which they came.

"When I signed up to volunteer helping those in need, I didn't realize what I had agreed to," Mulder joked as they walked toward their car. It seemed strange to him that they would go home by car only an hour after they had originally planned to go home. It was even stranger when they stepped into the clean Ford Taurus that had a full tank of gas and Scully's unfinished Starbuck's in the cupholder.

She stared at it as well, but didn't say anything as they started the car and were serenaded with joyful Christmas music.

"It's like two different worlds," Mulder said finally. "Normally there's something in between, isn't there?"

"You mean a hospital visit?" Scully asked dryly, and earned a laugh from her partner.

"Hey, you've got to give me credit. I didn't get hurt at all."

"Aside from the cuts and bruises, you're right," she conceded. "But you did see a zombie."

"I stand by my previous statement," he defended himself adamantly. "And it's probably still down there!"

She chuckled and shook her head. "Mulder, you never quit."

He smiled at his partner and asked, "Would you ever really want me to?" When she didn't answer, he continued, "And you don't even know that the zombie wasn't the one who caused the crash in the first place. He did have a maintenance uniform on, and in the absence of any indication of a terrorist attack, it's only reasonable to conclude that it was a maintenance or technical issue."

She sighed, and rested her head on her hand as her elbow sat upon the ridge of the car door. She closed her eyes.

"And the zombie obviously was the one who attacked that man, because the blood trail ended down in the rubble, but there was no body, not that we could find. Zombies apparently do climb, which means every movie we've seen is wrong…Scully? Are you listening to me?"

TARA SCULLY'S HOUSE

GEORGETOWN, D.C.

DECEMBER 24th, 2010

2320

Matt had taken a shower and slipped into flannel pajama pants and a new sweatshirt. He was exhausted and had climbed into bed to go to sleep when his mother cracked the door and entered.

"Hey, Buddy? You asleep yet?"

"Just got in bed," he answered.

She sat down on the edge of the bed and combed his hair back. "You doing okay?"

"I'm okay, I guess."

"That was some pretty scary stuff we saw tonight."

"I know. I'm not a baby, I can handle it."

She smiled. He was just like his father in that respect—brave, but proud. "You did very well. I'm very proud of you, Matty."

He smiled back at her. "I'm sorry your Christmas Eve kinda sucked. I know you wanted to teach me what it was like to spend time with homeless people, but I sorta got to anyway…"

She laughed. "Yes, I know. You got to spend more time with homeless people than you would have serving them dinner. So in that respect, it wasn't such a bad night."

"Well, that's the idea, right, Mom? I mean, the story of Christmas Eve and how Jesus was born but all that bad stuff was happening all around him? Herod killing babies and Mary being just a teenager and them having to run to Nazareth and stuff? But since Jesus was born, it was a good night."

With tears in her eyes and a smile on her face, she kissed Matt on the forehead and said, "You are such a blessing, Matthew."

He closed his eyes and said, "But Mom…how can we enjoy tomorrow morning? That little girl's mom is probably dead. We never found her. What will happen to her? How can we be happy with presents…how can we be happy at all, when we know there's so much bad stuff out there that happens?"

Her smile turned sad, and she looked down. "There will always be people less fortunate than us. That's why we try to do our part, and volunteer when we've got time, and give when we have spare cash. We do everything we can to live our lives and help others live theirs. But Matt…this is a hard lesson to learn…we can't go through life being sad about all the bad things that are out there."

"But—"

"Listen," she said softly. "We cannot fix the world and make it perfect by denying ourselves everything we have. But we can make a difference one step at a time. One way to do that is to be as successful and happy as we can be, so we can take some of that happiness and success and give to others. By being sad and poor, we're not helping anyone."

He frowned.

"Another way to do that," Tara continued, "is to never forget that sad feeling. To remember that sad feeling every time you feel greedy, or feel sorry for yourself. Because it will help you remember just how fortunate you are."

He nodded finally, and closed his eyes.

"Go to sleep," she kissed him again, and stood. "I love you."

"I love you too, Mom."

And that's what Christmas is all about, Tara thought. Love.