Wrote this as an assignment for my creative writing class. We went to a museum, and we had to write something based on at least one piece of artwork that we saw. This is what I came up with, hope you enjoy.

Also I have a laptop now so updates as well as more fics should be coming much sooner


The Doctor's Companion

It was sunny that day you took me to the museum, the bright rays shining through the windows in a deceivingly happy way. One would never guess what was to happen. Of course, with what we would get up to, it shouldn't have been so surprising. We had seen so much worse together, fought against so many things. We had seen so many wonderful and breathtaking worlds that I never would have thought existed.

That's what I still don't understand. We have the whole universe at our disposal, we could go anywhere, any-when we wanted to go, and you chose to take me to a tiny little art museum in the middle of nowhere. I didn't want to be there, it was so boring, but seeing you bouncing around like a little kid was something I couldn't say no to. You were happy, and that's all that mattered to me.

You noticed something was wrong in the museum. Of course you did, you always knew when something wasn't right. I had been excited for another adventure. Neither of us could have foreseen that it was the last we would share.

I wasn't worried, not even when you told me to go back, find somewhere safe. No, I had thought. I am not going to be stuck in that blue box, while you go have fun. You dragged me to this museum, I'm not leaving here bored! Wasn't I an idiot? I should've known better, should've realized the danger.

The káax' had come out of nowhere, its beak long and menacing. Its feathers were black, like the ash of Mt. Vesuvius. I can still picture it clearly, his piercing blue eyes narrowing as he changed my life forever.

You had chased it off, chased it all around the museum while I had tried to set a trap. Suddenly, I heard you yelling from another wing.

"Run! Lilly, get out of there!" Why should I? I've got you here, I'll be safe. Just like always.

That's a mistake I never should have made. It was a naïve thought, thinking you could save me from everything, and that we were invincible. I used to have fear on our adventures, and that fear kept me listening to you. Now that wasn't the case, I stopped listening, and I paid the price for it.

The bird-like creature came from around the corner. It had walked straight toward the trap I'd set. You silly man. We're going to be fine! Then the creature stopped, and turned to look right at me. I froze.

At first I thought that I was just afraid, but then I realized I really couldn't move. Looking down at myself, I was shocked; my feet had become stone-like. The sensation was slowly creeping up my legs and throughout the rest of my body. I felt my eyes grow wide as I stared up at the káax'.

Only now the bird was gone, and you were there in its place. You looked far older than I'd ever seen you, the first time you actually looked your age. I asked about the creature.

"Dead."

Simple enough of an answer, I suppose, though I don't believe it for a second. You were never one for killing. I asked what was happening to me. You told me I was becoming a part of the museum, and that there was nothing you could do to stop it.

I crossed my arms, soon they too would be frozen in place, and struggled not to cry. Of course, that's difficult when your whole world is crumbling away, but for you I would stay strong.

"I'm so sorry," you choked out. I could hear it in your voice, my time was almost up. I had one last thing to say before the end, however, and I could only hope that everything I wanted to tell you was conveyed in that one sentence.

"I love you."

Three words, but in them I expressed my gratitude, my sorrow, and my sincerest apologies. I do not blame you. You took me from my dull life and showed me the universe. We had the best of times, and though the end is heartbreaking, I regret none of it. If I had only listened to you, we wouldn't be in this mess. You can't change the past, however, and I can only hope you move on with your life.

As the last of the spell took over me, you finally broke down. You wept like a young boy does when his favorite toy breaks. You stood there crying for what seemed like hours, and it burned me that I couldn't help you. I had never seen you cry before, not like this. Perhaps you thought I couldn't see you. Maybe you didn't care.

You stopped rather abruptly, and pulled something out of your coat pocket. It was a blank notecard. You scribbled something on it before showing it to me, and placing it by my feet.

"The Doctor's Companion" was written on it. If I could, I would have cried and laughed at the same time. If I was to be stuck as a statue in a museum the rest of eternity, then at least I wouldn't be nameless. The name was, of course, fitting. I was your companion, and you were my Doctor.

You left shortly after that, and my world grew dark. I quickly grew tired of the visitors gawking up at me, grew tired of the question young children asked.

"Why does she look sad?"

I fell into what one may call a sort of sleep. My mind went blank, and I could ignore everything, and dream about us. Just you and me, travelling through time and space in a big, blue box.

There's one day, every year, that I come out of that state. That day is when you come to visit. You always tell me about the adventures you've had over the year that's passed, and I use it as new material for my dreams. Sometimes, you bring others with you, and I'm glad you've managed to move on with your life, and I'm happy you haven't forgotten me.

You'll always be my Doctor. No matter how much you change, or how many adventures you have, or how many people you take on those adventures, there will always be a part of you reserved for me. Just like I'll be there for you, because as the card says, I'll always be the Doctor's Companion.